DEDICATED TO SAFE AND HUMANE ANIMAL TRANSPORT - WORLDWIDE

The new NEWS page now highlights industry developments such as Members in Action, President's Corner and Migrations.  If you have any NEWS items featured here or in Migrations - Contact us today! 

  • 17 Nov 2014 9:23 AM | Anonymous
    An elephant has completed a 1,250-mile trek across land and sea to unpack his his trunk in Bristol.

    The six-year-old bull African elephant arrived at Noah’s Ark Zoo Farm in Bristol on Friday after travelling by land and sea from Sweden.

    The elephant, who is called M’Changa, has come to the UK to live at the zoo’s Elephant Eden.

    A long eventful journey from Boras Zoo in a specialist animal transport vehicle, including severe traffic problems in Hamburg, Germany and a delayed ferry crossing from Calais due to bad weather, ended peacefully under the cover of darkness with keepers from both parks celebrating a successful move for M’Changa.

    The transfer is the result of a long consultation period with advice from elephant experts and the European Endangered Species Programme (EEP).

    A zoo spokesman said: “M’Changa will be well cared for at Elephant Eden which is a large specially designed habitat built within the 110 acre park.

    “He will benefit from the new technology designed to offer African elephants the very best in health care and management.

    “Elephant Eden is the largest elephant habitat in northern Europe at 20 acres (eight hectares) and promotes welfare advances for the care of these complex mammals.”

    M’Changa, who weighs 1.5 tons, will join 30-year-old female Buta and nine-year-old male Janu at Noah’s Ark now as the project continues its development. A fourth elephant, a mature bull called Kruger, is also set to join the growing herd before the end of the year from Port Lympne Reserve in Kent.

    Read more: http://www.westerndailypress.co.uk/Noah-s-Ark-Zoo-Farm-welcomes-African-elephant/story-24513049-detail/story.html#ixzz3JKt0DTVm
  • 14 Nov 2014 9:20 AM | Anonymous
    Humane transport of livestock is important for both carcass quality and animal welfare. However, it is difficult to mitigate stress for animals in-transit. During a typical journey, calves lose weight due to the stress of weaning and being withdrawn from feed and water during transport. Many factors contribute to this stress, including welfare of the calves before transportation, and temperature and space allowance inside the trailer during transportation. A better understanding of the pre- and post-transportation risk factors and in-transit factors that influence calf welfare will inform strategies for improving animal welfare outcomes.

    Thus, 2,238 Canadian beef calves, representing 24 commercial loads transported from auctions or single sources to 4 feedlots, were evaluated for transportation welfare between September 2010 and November 2012 in Alberta. Two articles summarizing the results are featured in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Animal Science: "Trailer microclimate and calf welfare during fall-run transportation of beef calves in Alberta" and "Trailer microclimate during commercial transportation of feeder cattle and relationship to indicators of cattle welfare".

    Calves in the study received ear tags with devices that recorded temperature and humidity of the air around them. Similar data loggers were also fitted around various parts of the inside of the trailers (the "deck," "doghouse," "belly," and "back" compartments, 3 to 5 cm below the ceiling) and also to the driver's and passenger's mirrors to record ambient conditions. Truck drivers maintained a log of cattle, recording their conditions before the journey, at any stops during which calves were checked, and when they were unloaded at their destination.

    The study compared the relationship between cattle welfare and trailer microclimate during journeys between 11 and 23 hours in duration. Calves were weaned between 24 and 48 hours before transportation and had access to hay and water in the interval between weaning and transport. Space allowance was also taken into account and ranged from 0.56 to 1.17 m2/animal. Stress was measured before and after transit through salivary cortisol levels, hematocrit, shrink (percentage of initial body weight lost during transport), and morbidity.

    The researchers found that the internal conditions of the trailer are important for calf welfare. This includes temperature and humidity within the trailer and trailer movement. "Vehicle motion is an important consideration in monitoring in-transit climate...due to elevated temperature and humidity at the animal level," the authors wrote. Non-highway travel and stationary periods resulted in the greatest temperature and humidity at the animal level, compared with ambient temperature. Health of the animals before transportation was also an important determinant for post-transportation welfare.

    Variations in stress were observed during winter and summer journeys. Cattle transported in summer months experienced more shrink than those transported in winter months. However, researchers found increased salivary cortisol levels during winter transportation.

    Despite the rise in stress levels in the cattle, most animals arrived at their destination healthy and in good condition. The transportation process did not appear to cause distress to the livestock. Because the calves still expressed some degree of stress, the authors suggest that further research should be conducted on the relationship between transportation and cattle welfare.

    "We inferred that the study results support future investigation of the extension of in-transit microclimate as a risk factor for post-transport treatment and disease," the authors wrote. "...The influence of transport did not result in poor welfare within the study population but may be of importance for higher-risk cattle."

    Full Story here: http://phys.org/news/2014-11-relationship-cattle-welfare-trailer-microclimate.html

  • 06 Nov 2014 4:20 PM | Anonymous

    Apprentice jockey Ross Coakley speaks to Mikey Stafford about the challenges of crossing the world to ride at Flemington

    On Tuesday, Johnny Murtagh will endeavour to become only the second Irish trainer after Dermot Weld to win the Melbourne Cup.

    The five-time Irish champion jockey saddles 8-1 shot Mutual Regard and Royal Diamond at Flemington and, other than the trainer himself and owner Andrew Tinkler, there is no one with a greater vested interest than apprentice jockey Ross Coakley.

    The 20-year-old from Monasterevin has been Mutual Regard’s near constant companion since they touched down in Melbourne more than a month ago, on 27 September. Since then Coakley has taken the six-year-old’s temperature, exercised him, fed him and overseen a weight-gain program so that the Ebor winner regains the mass lost in transit.

    After two weeks Murtagh’s head girl, Valerie Keatley and another lad, Ben Lewis, arrived with Royal Diamond, and the two Irish raiders have been training together in Werribee quarantine centre on the outskirts of Melbourne in preparation for “the race that stops a nation”.

    Murtagh arrived early on Thursday to oversee the final preparations of the two horses for Tinkler’s big gamble. Between quarantine, transport and staffing the price of running a European horse in the Melbourne Cup is estimated to top $150,000.

    After more than four weeks in the country Coakley reckons he is “nearly half Aussie at this stage”, as he gives an insight into the massive operation involved in attempting a raid on the highlight of the Australian racing calendar.

    Before flying on 25 September Mutual Regard had to spend two weeks in quarantine in Newmarket in the United Kingdom.”They can use the Newmarket gallops in the afternoon but their only contact with other horses can be with ones going to Australia,” said Coakley.

    While the apprentice was flying via Abu Dhabi and Sydney, Mutual Regard was travelling on a specially-designed transport plane, supervised and cared for by a groom from horse transport company IRT (an ATA member).

    “The plane is divided in two, horses below and the people on top. They are lifted on to the plane in boxes or containers, they would be like transport containers, maybe half the size, some of it would be open-grilled so they can see through that,” explained Coakley, who arrived just three hours before the sixth favourite in the betting.

    Tired and jet-lagged, he had to prepare the stables before Mutual Regard’s arrival and spent the next two weeks “trying to catch up with naps”.

    “That was a long day,” said Coakley, who does not believe the horse was feeling the same ill-effects after his trip halfway around the world – the fact that horses only sleep for around three hours a day could explain why don’t appear to be affected by jetlag

    “No, a horse doesn’t get jetlag. Well, not this time anyway, which was my first time with the experience. What I see is they don’t suffer too badly, any of the horses I saw get off the box at least. It can affect them in different ways like it can affect people, but our horses seemed fine.

    “The big thing is they lose weight, on the average between five and 15kg. But when you take it that a horse weighs between 415 and 500 odd kilos, in the grand scheme of things it is not a lot,” added Coakley. “They are not drinking as much water, or not getting fed as much. When they fly they can be a bit more picky on drinking water.”

    While Coakley had to adjust to long days and 6am starts, as he took the horse’s temperature every morning for the quarantine vets, every effort was made to make Mutual Regard feel right at home in Victoria.

    “What we try to do is try and keep the same routine as we would at home, work the same way, feed them the same time. Horses are creatures of habit, it is best to try and keep routine, that is what we try do.”

    After Japanese stayer and Melbourne Cup favourite Admire Rakti ($5.50) won the Caulfield Cup and Aidan O’Brien finally broke his Australian duck with the aptly-named Adelaide in the Cox Plate, there is genuine fear down under that foreign raiders could complete a clean sweep of the spring majors.

    Having seen Admire Rakti and the German third favourite Protectionist ($7.50) up close in Werribee alongside the Irish pair, Coakley believes Australian fears are well founded.

    “Looking at it, it is very much between the internationals,” he said. “Protectionist and Admire Rakti both seem to be in good form, Admire Rakti’s win in Caulfield was very, very impressive. It was a hard race. Protectionist, his work around Werribee is very, very impressive. Whether he would want quick, quick ground I’m not sure.”

    Coakley rode Mutual Regard to an impressive victory in the two-mile handicap on Irish Derby Day at the Curragh but missed out on the big ride at York and had to watch Louis Steward guide him home in the Ebor after picking up a three-day whip ban when winning on Steuben at Southwell.

    He will be watching from outside the rail again on Tuesday as Murtagh has handed three-time Melbourne Cup winner Damien Oliver the ride.

    “I think lots of European trainers, they tend to want the service of Australian jockeys as they are on these tracks all the time,” said Coakley.

    “It’s a different tempo, there’s no sustained gallop, the tracks are tight, they don’t like tracing too wide. They go quite slow and then sprint. It can catch out European horses – our stayers can get lost. You need a certain style of horse,” he added.”The best and most experienced of European jockeys can get caught out. They’ll go fast for the first furlong with the pace, then when the rest drop back they try to get back in position, pull up the handbrake, and can struggle to get back into contention.

    “Hiring an Australian jockey can minimise the risk of that happening. They are less likely to get caught out. That’s not to say it can’t happen still.”

    Employing Oliver and Royal Diamond’s pilot Steve Arnold helps, but how does Coakley assess the chances of either Murtagh raider emulating Weld’s history-making Vintage Crop (1993), the first northern hemisphere winner of the Melbourne Cup, or Media Puzzle (2002), Weld’s second winner in the race.

    “At home Mutual Regard can be lazy,” said Coakley. “But at the races he has done the business time in, time out. He is very consistent. Other horses are the opposite, they’re world beaters in training but then bottle it in races. There’s no prize money in the gallops.

    “I think Royal Diamond is overpriced in the sense he is a dual group 1 winner. I think his age is being taken against him,’ he added of the nine year old. “The ground being hard could come against him. He is a strong traveller, which should sort the racing here.”

    It’s been a long journey for both Irish challengers, now all that remains is the 3,200-metre sprint to the Flemington post.

    Story: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/nov/03/horses-dont-get-jetlag-the-life-of-a-foreign-jockey-at-the-melbourne-cup

  • 06 Nov 2014 4:18 PM | Anonymous
    Panel will provide advice to NHVR on advanced fatigue management applications.

    Fatigue experts appointed to scrutinise AFM applicants
    The NHVR is the body responsible for advanced fatigue management (AFM) accreditation.

    Trucking firms that lodge advanced fatigue management (AFM) applications deemed to be risky will have to front a panel of fatigue experts to gain approval for their plans.

    The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) has established an independent five-member panel to advise it on AFM applications in a move that also impacts upon companies with existing AFM accreditation.

    The NHVR is the body responsible for handing out AFM accreditation, and the fatigue expert reference group (FERG) will be called upon when applicants undergo a risk assessment, which scores a business based on consideration of fatigue risks and countermeasures.

    "Under AFM business rules, the NHVR must screen AFM applicants using the risk classification system (RCS). Applications that have multiple medium or high risks must be referred to the FERG for advice," the NHVR says.

    "Operators whose AFM applications are referred to FERG must submit a written safety case, but can elect to present this safety case in person to the FERG."

    The appointment of the panel affects operators with existing AFM accreditation received when the states ran fatigue management.

    According to the NHVR, applications that must be referred to the FERG "will include many current AFM-accredited operators who were approved by former state-based regulators".

    National Transport Commission (NTC) deputy chair and commissioner Carolyn Walsh will chair the panel, which includes professors Drew Dawson, Phillipa Gander, Narelle Haworth and Ann Williamson.

    Unlike the 12-hour standard hours regime or the 14-hour basic fatigue management module (BFM), AFM accreditation allows businesses to develop their own fatigue management systems and processes for driving hours and rest.

    "Operators accredited under the AFM scheme have NHVR approval to move beyond simply counting hours in a driver’s diary to running their entire business with a direct focus on managing fatigue," NHVR CEO Sal Petroccitto says.

    "They are accountable for making sure their drivers are truly fit for duty and have good fatigue management in place, not only during each journey but every day of the week that could impact on that journey."

    Since taking control of AFM, the NHVR has created AFM templates for the livestock transport sector to save trucking operators the hassle of building their own plans from scratch.

    Story: http://www.fullyloaded.com.au/news/industry/1411/fatigue-experts-appointed-to-scrutinise-afm-applicants/

  • 06 Nov 2014 4:16 PM | Anonymous
    Study compares relationship between cattle welfare and trailer microclimate during cattle transport

    Humane transport of livestock is important for both carcass quality and animal welfare. However, it is difficult to mitigate stress for animals in-transit. During a typical journey, calves lose weight due to the stress of weaning and being withdrawn from feed and water during transport. Many factors contribute to this stress, including welfare of the calves before transportation, and temperature and space allowance inside the trailer during transportation. A better understanding of the pre- and post-transportation risk factors and in-transit factors that influence calf welfare will inform strategies for improving animal welfare outcomes.

    Thus, 2,238 Canadian beef calves, representing 24 commercial loads transported from auctions or single sources to 4 feedlots, were evaluated for transportation welfare between September 2010 and November 2012 in Alberta. Two articles summarizing the results are featured in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Animal Science: "Trailer microclimate and calf welfare during fall-run transportation of beef calves in Alberta" and "Trailer microclimate during commercial transportation of feeder cattle and relationship to indicators of cattle welfare".

    Calves in the study received ear tags with devices that recorded temperature and humidity of the air around them. Similar data loggers were also fitted around various parts of the inside of the trailers (the "deck," "doghouse," "belly," and "back" compartments, 3 to 5 cm below the ceiling) and also to the driver's and passenger's mirrors to record ambient conditions. Truck drivers maintained a log of cattle, recording their conditions before the journey, at any stops during which calves were checked, and when they were unloaded at their destination.

    The study compared the relationship between cattle welfare and trailer microclimate during journeys between 11 and 23 hours in duration. Calves were weaned between 24 and 48 hours before transportation and had access to hay and water in the interval between weaning and transport. Space allowance was also taken into account and ranged from 0.56 to 1.17 m2/animal. Stress was measured before and after transit through salivary cortisol levels, hematocrit, shrink (percentage of initial body weight lost during transport), and morbidity.

    The researchers found that the internal conditions of the trailer are important for calf welfare. This includes temperature and humidity within the trailer and trailer movement. "Vehicle motion is an important consideration in monitoring in-transit climate...due to elevated temperature and humidity at the animal level," the authors wrote. Non-highway travel and stationary periods resulted in the greatest temperature and humidity at the animal level, compared with ambient temperature. Health of the animals before transportation was also an important determinant for post-transportation welfare.

    Variations in stress were observed during winter and summer journeys. Cattle transported in summer months experienced more shrink than those transported in winter months. However, researchers found increased salivary cortisol levels during winter transportation.

    Despite the rise in stress levels in the cattle, most animals arrived at their destination healthy and in good condition. The transportation process did not appear to cause distress to the livestock. Because the calves still expressed some degree of stress, the authors suggest that further research should be conducted on the relationship between transportation and cattle welfare.

    "We inferred that the study results support future investigation of the extension of in-transit microclimate as a risk factor for post-transport treatment and disease," the authors wrote. "...The influence of transport did not result in poor welfare within the study population but may be of importance for higher-risk cattle."

    Story: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-11/asoa-mcm110614.php

  • 06 Nov 2014 4:15 PM | Anonymous
    KATHMANDU, NOV 04 - The Supreme Court of India has asked animal rights activists and other parties, including the Home Ministry and state governments, to come up with an action plan for effective implementation of the restriction on the export of animals to Nepal during the Gadhimai festival.

    The court on Monday directed all the parties to meet on November 14 and discuss the modalities to implement the export ban, and report the developments to it on November 22.

    On October 17, the Indian apex court passed an interim order to the Union of India and state governments of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and West Bengalundefinedfrom where a majority of the animals are transportedundefinedto prevent ‘illegal transportation’ across the border.

    “We direct the respondents to ensure that no live cattle and buffaloes are exported out of India into Nepal, but under licence,” read the order.

    NG Jayasimha, managing director of Humane Society International, India, said, “We’ve arrived at the most crucial time, which is implementation. We have reached the last mile and we will make sure that we complete the journey successfully.”

    Complying with the order, the Home Ministry said they have issued necessary directives to the Armed Border Force and Indian Police. Jayasimha said they will now be working with all other parties to prepare logistics and ensure that the order is duly carried out.

    “For an order of this scale to be implemented just a few activists won’t work, we need collaboration and that’s where we are headed,” he said. At least a quarter of a million animals, including buffaloes, rats, snakes, pigeons, hens and goats are sacrificed during the two-day sacrificial ritual to appease Goddess Gadhimai in Bara district. Devotees from Nepal and neighbouring states of India will flock to Barayapur for the once-in-five years festival that falls on November 28 and 29.

    Animal Welfare Network Nepal President Manoj Gautam said they are encouraged by the Indian Supreme Court’s decision and expect Nepal’s court and other regulating bodies to also take positive steps and work collaboratively. “We are hopeful that government bodies will also work effectively to bring about a change,” he said.

    While activities on the other side of the border could significantly reduce the number of animals to be sacrificedundefinedsince 70 per cent of the livestock comes from Indiaundefinedanimal welfare advocates in Nepal say that a large number of animals will still be sacrificed for which they are working with the government to bring about changes in the way the sacrifices are performed.

    Dr Umesh Dahal, senior veterinary officer at the Livestock Department, said that a blanket ban on animal sacrifice is not possible but they will work towards better managementundefinedfor hygiene purpose and to secure animal welfare.

    The government, with inputs from animal welfare groups, has finalised an action plan, which directs a sufficient number of animal health inspection posts to be set up, to inspect animals that come in, along with post sacrifice management. But, Gautam said, without effective implementation strategy, the action plan could fall through. “Our monitors will be at the site noting every case that the government deals with,” he said. “We will try to help the government team by providing information on how they can better function at the site.”

    Story: http://www.ekantipur.com/2014/11/04/top-story/act-to-enforce-animal-export-ban/397173.html

  • 06 Nov 2014 4:11 PM | Anonymous
    f B'alam were on eHarmony or Match.com, his dating profile might look like this:

    Single, spotted male, seeking companionship. Loves destroying toys, hanging out on his favorite log and dining out on dead rats.

    Instead of Tinder or OKCupid, B'alam is relying on the matchmakers in charge of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan Program, which sent him last week from his home at the Milwaukee County Zoo to the San Antonio Zoo.

    His potential mate, a year-old female named Arizona, is coming from the zoo in Seattle.

    San Antonio zookeepers are hopeful that the pair of jaguars will take a shine to each other and someday, maybe in a year or so, they'll be blessed with babies.

    When B'alam, which means jaguar in Mayan, and his brother Zean were born to Pat and Stella at the Milwaukee County Zoo last year, zookeepers knew the family would eventually get broken up.

    Just like in the wild. Had the brothers been born in the wild, their mother would have kicked them out to fend for themselves months ago, not long after she finished nursing and before she became ready to breed again.

    Their births and those of other animals in the Species Survival Plan Program at AZA-accredited facilities are carefully monitored for breeding.

    A variety of factors are considered in ranking animals on the lists, including age, gender, geographic location, parentage, behavior and genetics.

    "It's definitely a blend of art and science," said Stacey Johnson, coordinator of the jaguar Species Survival Plan since 2006.

    Decades ago a large number of animals in zoos were captured in the wild. But most zoos no longer do that, instead breeding their captive animals and swapping with other facilities.

    While that's more humane than plucking creatures from their native habitat, it also means the pool of genetics is not as diverse as it is in the wild.

    Enter the Species Survival Plan, which was started in 1981 to concentrate on endangered animals whose best chance to survive might be captive breeding programs.

    The plan helps maintain healthy and genetically diverse populations of more than 150 species among AZA-accredited facilities.

    In some cases, the last few surviving examples of a species are in zoos.

    "It allows us to rescue species on the verge of extinction. There's a growing number of species of wildlife that would be gone if it hadn't been for zoos intervening, sometimes at the last minute," said Johnson, director of collections at San Diego Zoo Global.

    Zoos do not buy or sell animals, but the zoo acquiring the animal pays for transportation.

    While Stella was born in captivity, Pat came from the wild. He was a "problem" jaguar in Belize. But instead of killing him, authorities in that Central American country took him to a local zoo and eventually transferred him to Milwaukee.

    Because Pat's genetics are from the wild, his offspring are higher up on the list of desirable jaguars at American zoos.

    There are 111 jaguars in 46 accredited facilities participating in the jaguar Species Survival Plan, including 58 females.

    Of that total, six were recently at the Milwaukee County Zoo, including Pat and Stella, their first litter of B'alam and Zean, and their second litter of a female and male born in the summer.

    Under the plan, B'alam was chosen to go to San Antonio while Zean will head to the Elmwood Park Zoo near Philadelphia. Zean will be paired with a female jaguar from Seattle named Inka.

    Milwaukee's female and male cubs born this summer, which haven't been named yet, will likely go to other zoos next year.

    Both zoos are pumped to get jaguar cubs.

    "I can't say enough how thrilled we are," said Anita Santiago, mammals department supervisor in San Antonio.

    The San Antonio Zoo had a breeding jaguar pair several years ago, but the couple did not produce offspring. Its most recent jaguar, a 9-year-old female named Maya, is not a good candidate for breeding and was sent to a zoo in Albuquerque to make room for B'alam and his new mate.

    Elmwood Park Zoo loves jaguars so much it made the cat a part of the zoo's logo. The zoo is raising $4 million for a new jaguar exhibit expected to be finished in 11/2 to 2 years.

    The previous Elmwood Park jaguar couple, which did not successfully breed, died recently.

    "It was a huge blow to our zoo. They were easily the most beloved animals here," said Shaun Rogers, Elmwood Park Zoo marketing director.

    Moving to a new home is not easy undefined especially for jaguars. Just getting them into their moving crate is a challenge. Which is why Milwaukee zookeepers Amanda Ista and Jessica Munson started getting B'alam, the first to go, ready a few weeks ago.

    No tranquilizers will be used during the journey to their new homes because zookeepers don't know how or when they will wake up.

    So instead zookeepers gradually introduced B'alam to his crate to get him accustomed to it, first by leaving both doors open, then just one door open, then placing pieces of chicken inside and finally a nice treat undefined a dead rat undefined to induce the hungry and curious feline to go inside.

    "The public always asks us, 'Aren't you sorry to see them go?'" Munson said. "We have to do what's best for the animals."

    Ista added: "It's like health care workers. You have to keep some separation, but sometimes you do get close to an animal."

    Because there are no direct flights from Milwaukee to San Antonio, B'alam was taken by truck to O'Hare International Airport in Chicago and flown in the cargo hold to Houston, where he was picked up and driven to San Antonio.

    Though Milwaukee is losing two of its jaguar cubs, the zoo frequently gets animals from other facilities.

    Currently on the Milwaukee County Zoo wish list: an Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake, a Chilean flamingo, an African spoonbill and a red kangaroo.

    Story: http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/milwaukee-county-zoo-sends-jaguar-to-meet-mate-in-san-antonio-b99381626z1-281252241.html


  • 31 Oct 2014 11:41 AM | Anonymous
    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service sent this bulletin at 10/29/2014 11:21 AM EDT

    We have completed the much-needed maintenance of our current Animal Care Information System (ACIS) search tool.

    We appreciate your patience as we’ve worked through numerous technical issues. You can expect your data searches to be much faster now. We envision the search tool to once again be a valuable resource for you and thousands of other stakeholders searching for information about individuals and facilities regulated under the Animal Welfare Act – including inspection reports, animal inventories and research facility annual reports.

    Our original plan to create a brand new ACIS remains in place, so we will continue to develop that in the months ahead. In the meantime, we are pleased to present to you this repaired search tool which will allow you to query and receive data a lot quicker.

    The search tool is located here on our website.

    As always, if you have questions or are in need of assistance with your data search, please contact Dave Sacks in our Riverdale, Md., office at 301-851-3749.

    At USDA Animal Care, ensuring the welfare of the animals we regulate is at the heart of everything we do.
  • 31 Oct 2014 11:39 AM | Anonymous
    ARCADIA, Calif. – Leigh Court is expected to zip pretty quickly through seven furlongs as one of the top choices for the Breeders' Cup Filly & Mare Sprint, and Woodbine based conditioner Josie Carroll is hoping for an uneventful trip. But getting to Santa Anita was anything but uneventful.

    After the 10 hour van trip from Toronto, Leigh Court experienced some first flight jitters once she loaded onto a Tex Sutton horse transport aircraft in Louisville.

    "She wasn't very comfortable on the plane," Carroll said Tuesday after sending Leigh Court to the track for a look around. "They took her off, tranquilized her, and she still wasn't very happy. They were going to put her back on the following day, but at that point, it seemed probably wiser to put her on a van." Carroll said the 36-hour van ride went off without a hitch, and the filly relaxed all the way to California.

    Leigh Court won the Grade II Thoroughbred Club of America Stakes at Keeneland last time out, beating Stonetastic and Southern Honey, two fillies she will face again in the Filly & Mare Sprint.

    She will start from gate 6 in a field of 10, and Caroll said she is coming into the race in top form.

    "This filly has trained into this race very, very well," Carroll said. "I know it's a tough field of fillies but she's a tough horse."

    Gary Boulanger will ride.

    Osbornes get first Cup starter: Kentucky state Rep. David Osborne and his wife, Lori Hebel-Osborne of Prospect have their first Breeders' Cup starter in Majestic Harbor, who earned a free roll in the Breeders' Cup Classic by virtue of capturing the Grade I Gold Cup at Santa Anita.

    The 6-year-old horse, who spent much of his career stabled in Kentucky with trainer Paul McGee before relocating to Sean McCarthy in California, subsequently was sixth in the Pacific Classic and fourth in the Awesome Again. Both races were won by unbeaten 3-year-old Shared Belief, the Classic favorite.

    "To see the horse walk out of the stall with the (Breeders' Cup) saddle towel on, the tears just" started, Hebel-Oborne said. "It was emotional. I guess it's like somebody seeing their son wear their Super Bowl jersey. You just can't believe it."

    Hebel-Osborne operates a marketing firm that manages corporate hospitality at big events, so she has been at many of the Breeders' Cups.

    "Certainly I've worked many Breeders' Cups, but never on this side of it," she said. "It makes me feel brand new, like I've never done it before."

    Hebel-Osborne says she will work Friday, but her clients are giving her a respite (Saturday). "They said 'enjoy this.' I'm still going to visit a bunch of my customers. And any of my customers coming, I'm buying them a $2 win ticket on my horse."

    Majestic Harbor is 20-1 in the morning line. The $20,000 Keeneland yearling purchase has earned $674,014.

    Euro buzz: Much of the buzz around the barn where European runners are stabled at Santa Anita surrounds Toronado, winner of the Queen Anne Stakes at Ascot earlier this year. The Irish bred colt is owned by Al Shaquab Racing, the stable of Sheikh Joaan Bin Hamad of Qatar. He is the 5-2 morning line choice in the $2 million Breeders Cup Mile.

    Harry Herbert, racing adviser to Al Shaquab, said Toronado has been a very consistent performer, but will face a new kind of challenge on Saturday.

    "The form is rock solid," Herbert said. "But here it's different. You've got speed, everything happens, the tightness of the track. The rhythm of the race is going to be very different than he's used to. That's the big question."

    $300 million question: Top jockey John Velazquez, whose mounts have won more than $300 million and counting, will field questions from the public in a live online chat Wednesday from 7:00 p.m. To 8:00 pm Wednesday evening. The live chat is hosted by www.jockeytalk360.com, a new website featuring news and social media interaction. Velazquez' mounts include Cigar Street in the Breeders' Cup Classic, Stephanie's Kitten in the Filly & Mare Turf, and Thank You Marylou in the Filly & Mare Sprint.

    USA Today

  • 31 Oct 2014 11:36 AM | Anonymous
    DENMARK - With African swine fever just 10 hours driving time away, the Danish pig industry is to intensify disease protection measures at its land border with Germany by building a state-of-the-art vehicle wash at Padborg.

    According to the Danish agriculture organisation, Landbrug & Fødevarer (Agriculture & Food; L&F), 22,000 trucks cross the Danish border every year with piglets and pigs that are sold abroad.

    These vehicles carry a risk of transmitting infectious diseases to Danish pig herds and so the Danish Pig Research Centre (PRC) has decided to invest in a new car wash at the border, with the support of L&F.

    PRC President, Erik Larsen, said: "There are a number of diseases such as African swine fever and PED lurking just outside Denmark, and we must do everything to stop before reaching Denmark.

    "Previously, there was a legal requirement for the washing of animal transport at the border, but as it fell away, we took the responsibility on ourselves by establishing the Danish Transport Standard with an extra safety wash when vehicles enter the country."

    African swine fever is found regularly in several of the countries bordering Russia. The disease has now spread into the entire Baltic region and is now found in eastern Poland. The fear is that it will spread further across Europe.

    The United States has tremendous problems with a very aggressive type of gastrointestinal disease, porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED), which particularly affects piglets and causes mortality through diarrhoea and dehydration. Between 50 and 100 per cent of baby pigs die of the disease.
    L&F says that the virus is also found in Germany, Italy and Asia. There is a high risk that this aggressive PED type at a time can gain a foothold in Europe, and that is partly why VSP now increases hygiene requirements at the border.

    Mr Larsen said that swine fever is now less than 10 hours away from Denmark, and that bacteria and viruses can be transmitted via the trucks moving in high risk areas such as Poland, where many Danish piglets are sold at the moment.

    "The precautions to avoid infection in Denmark need to be strengthened, and that is what we are doing now," he added.

    Currently, trucks are subject to 48 hours quarantine after it has been washed at the border. But with the new and improved disinfection method, the quarantine time is reduced to 12 hours.

    "Proper washing and disinfection is more important than time. Our studies show that washing can be done much better and more professionally than what we see today," said Mr Larsen.

    The new car wash is being built in Padborg and PRD expects it to be in use from next year. The disinfection costs will be paid by the transport companies but PRC says the shorter quarantine period will help to allay the extra cost.

    ThePigSite News Desk

2018 Animal Transportation Association (ATA)
678 Bluebell Drive, Terra Alta, WV  26764   USA
(P) + 1 202.676.7077
Contact us at
info@animaltransportationassociation.org

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software